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Interview with Lyndal Irons

Lyndal Irons is a Sydney-based photographer and writer focused on local reportage and interested in seeking out parts of Australian society that are familiar, accessible, yet not often closely encountered. 

YOU CAN FOLLOW LYNDAL’S WORK HERE

WEBSITES - lyndalirons.com.au / luminacollective.com.au

INSTAGRAM - @lyndalirons

FACEBOOK - Lyndal Irons Photography

Revellers at the Sleep Festival, Parramatta Road, 2013. ©Lyndal Irons

Revellers at the Sleep Festival, Parramatta Road, 2013. ©Lyndal Irons

Hi Lyndal, thank you very much for joining us! Could you start off by introducing yourself to the readers and telling us a bit about your work?

My name is Lyndal Irons. I’m a Sydney-based photographer interested in unscripted photography and environmental portraiture.

What first drew you to photography?

I was always interested and had studied darkroom and SLRs during school. But I completed a degree in writing and publishing after and didn’t take up photography seriously until my mid-twenties when I enlisted in street photography and a documentary photography classes with Marco Bok.  

Paul, Northam Ave, Bankstown, 2017. ©Lyndal Irons

Paul, Northam Ave, Bankstown, 2017. ©Lyndal Irons

Did you have any early influences or mentors that shaped you photographically?

Marco, who first introduced me to Robert Frank who remains one of my favourites to this day. Also Alan Davies who was curator of Photography at the State Library of New South Wales. I continually meet with photographers around Sydney who are interested in similar creative projects and or problems to me and learned a lot from our conversations, debates and works in progress.


“Most people don’t know how to look - it’s a pretty amazing skill to acquire when it clicks into place. When you are open and really looking there are many moments of real and unexpected connection in life. . . when people you don’t know are generous - and when the world moving around you is generous - you end a day feeling properly alive.”


When you are walking around, with camera in hand, what thoughts generally are going through your mind?

Most often initially I’m not enjoying myself much - it doesn’t come naturally to approach strangers or photograph without permission. But on a good day I’ll connect to something - or see the potential for something interesting - and my thoughts shift. I get excited about a place, a chance encounter or the existence of something or someone. And suddenly life is really rich and full of potential. When I first came to photography it was a revelation to look into the same world I’d always lived in, now seeing a kaleidoscope of synchronicity and patterns. Shadows, light, windows made by arms and buildings and things passing by that will never happen again in the same combination. Near empty space where just what you were wanting walks in to your frame just at the right time. Most people don’t know how to look - it’s a pretty amazing skill to acquire when it clicks into place. When you are open and really looking there are many moments of real and unexpected connection in life. Which is what it’s really about for me. There is rejection and suspicion and anger out there toward photographers in public spaces. But when people you don’t know are generous - and when the world moving around you is generous - you end a day feeling properly alive.

Bankstown Street Scene . Shot as part of a collaboration with  @tobymartinmusic  on  Songs From Northam Ave  on cover art for his album of the same name.

Bankstown Street Scene. Shot as part of a collaboration with @tobymartinmusic on Songs From Northam Ave on cover art for his album of the same name.

Do you have a clear idea, project or body of work in mind before you begin photographing?

If I’m doing street photography then no - I may have a theme or an idea in mind or one that develops after a few shots begin to link together. I’ve shot street as part of a project about a street (On Parramatta Road) and have been commissioned by the State Library of NSW to document street as an indication of ritual and people and era around ANZAC Day’s 100th milestone. So there is always a place that ties things together and maybe a theme or key idea. In general I’m interested in street as a historical document: the details, the people, their activities at a certain time. I don’t think you need a further idea for that because the world is always changing. The job is never done and the brief is never old. I just wander out into the world and do my best to imagine I’ve never been there before.

Hakone, Japan. ©Lyndal Irons

Hakone, Japan. ©Lyndal Irons

For other project work (which is the majority of what I do, closer to documentary) the answer is yes. I’ll research and have a few terms or ideas I am particularly interested in illustrating. But this is always steamrolled by the narrative as it is discovered. If it’s a good subject you should learn something from it and it will direct you. It’s best when it completely surprises you and turns out differently to anything you could have thought up yourself. I start with research and some ideas. But as I talk to people, what’s said leads what’s photographed, the aesthetic and order of a series.

A lot of my work has started as an experiment to choose something and find out if I can photograph it be it one room, one road, one person, one event, one community. And almost always these things when you follow them branch out really beautifully into multi-layered stories that keep giving more depth.

Hakone, Japan. ©Lyndal Irons

Hakone, Japan. ©Lyndal Irons

You’re a member of Lumina Collective (https://www.luminacollective.com.au/). Could you tell us a bit more about the collective and what you have in store for 2019?

Lumina is a collective of eight Australian women working across Australia and at the moment we have two members working internationally in Asia and the UK. We work collaboratively on projects and also individually on our own photographic careers. At the moment we have a major exhibition called Echoes running at the Art Gallery of Ballarat until March 10. With a symposium happening on March 2 in the gallery. There is more in the works for later in the year but it’s too early to go into details at the moment. We also have a flash sale running from this Thursday [7th of Feb., 2019] if anyone out there is interested in buying a print!

Late night football at Wash n' Wax, Concord. ©Lyndal Irons

Late night football at Wash n' Wax, Concord. ©Lyndal Irons

Your proposal for ‘On Paramatta Road’ received the prestigious ‘Pool Grant’ in 2015, what was it like winning it, then undertaking, completing and exhibiting the project in the timeframe of one year?

Well I’d been working on that series for five years prior to winning the grant - so luckily I had a head start. As a long term project it was the perfect incentive to finally think about what shots I needed to get in order to round it out. And I was given the money and support to present the work at the scale I felt warranted six years of work - which I could not have done on my own. Winning the Pool Grant was enormously encouraging and affirmed my belief that local stories were worth investing time an money toward. Even though I had a head start there was still so much to do. Continued shooting, editing a large body of work shot in different stages of my development and trying to make it fit together, and curating for the space alongside the rest of the logistics involved in putting together a solo show.

Carsell, Parramatta Road, Homebush. ©Lyndal Irons

Carsell, Parramatta Road, Homebush. ©Lyndal Irons

What advice would you give to photographers applying for grants or awards?

Make sure you can actually complete the project you’ve chosen. A lot of good ideas get turfed in selection because there is no guarantee the logistics or access will come together - there’s too many risks to it falling over. Do the work toward access first and have references prepared to prove it. It helps to have a project that is timely and needs to be completed within a set deadline. Take time to write your application over a week or more.

Money for beer and vodka , Tallinn Estonia 2018. ©Lyndal Irons

Money for beer and vodka, Tallinn Estonia 2018. ©Lyndal Irons

The story of your current exhibition and body of work entitled ‘Pildil’ is fascinating; could you tell us about the project and what you discovered during the process of making the work?

Pildil is my contribution to the exhibition Echoes, Lumina Collective’s current exhibition at the art Gallery of Ballarat.  

It’s my first attempt at documenting a story that belongs to my own family. In mid-2018 I took my mother other to Estonia to meet descendants from my great-grandmother’s family, supported by a grant from Canon Australia.

It’s been around 100 years since my great grandparents left Estonia. They never went back. My grandfather never visited. My mother had never been. Occupied Estonia hasn’t always been an easy place to go to. But we’d been in contact on and off via letters across the generations regardless.

Street scene 2 , Tallinn Estonia, 2018. ©Lyndal Irons

Street scene 2, Tallinn Estonia, 2018. ©Lyndal Irons

The resulting work is a compilation of photo and video sketches outlining my impressions of the country deserted by my great grandmother, the changes from what she knew and the contrast to the country she settled in. And layers my voice to the correspondence exchanged over generations since she left.

It has two components married by postcard format: a visual notebook of travelling to and through a place that was connected to me but totally new. And a second component documenting the day we visited the house my great grandmother grew up in on an island off Estonia. Inside it was quite powerful and very surprising to find stacks of letters and postcards we’d written back to her sister who continued to live there until her death in the mid ‘90s. You don’t expect to find your life outlined in letters and photos in an old rotting abandoned house in woodlands on the other side of the world … it was a jolt and a material, undeniable connection to place and people I hadn’t encountered before.

Fruit Sales , Tallinn Estonia 2018. ©Lyndal Irons

Fruit Sales, Tallinn Estonia 2018. ©Lyndal Irons

Lighthouse , Estonia 2018. ©Lyndal Irons

Lighthouse, Estonia 2018. ©Lyndal Irons

What is your favourite photo of yours right now and why?

I like two from Pildil at the moment. This image [ABOVE] of a woman and her dog on the island of Saaremaa, Estonia. Just a moment out of public life. But there is something about the long shadow cast by an out-of-frame building that exists to light. And novelty shooting in the softer European sun where you can get details in the shadows in the middle of the day. I also love Shores of Lake Võrtsjärv with the couple relaxing by the reeds and puddles. I was there to explore my own history and I love the contrast of everything I’ve experienced in Australian beach leisure culture. And her sultry gaze.

The shores of Lake Võrtsjärv , Estonia 2018. ©Lyndal Irons

The shores of Lake Võrtsjärv, Estonia 2018. ©Lyndal Irons

YOU CAN FOLLOW LYNDAL’S WORK HERE

WEBSITES - lyndalirons.com.au / luminacollective.com.au

INSTAGRAM - @lyndalirons

FACEBOOK - Lyndal Irons Photography

Interview with Meg Hewitt

Meg Hewitt is one of Australia’s leading contemporary photographers, renowned for her series Tokyo is Yours, which was published as a photobook in 2017. She is running a 5-Day workshop in Tokyo from March 28th-April 1st, 2019.

You can follow Meg’s work here:

WEBSITE - meg-hewitt.com

INSTAGRAM - @meghewitt_

FACEBOOK - meghewittphoto

Yoko in Spring, Tokyo 2016 from the series  Tokyo is Yours  ©Meg Hewitt

Yoko in Spring, Tokyo 2016 from the series Tokyo is Yours ©Meg Hewitt

Hi Meg, thank you very much for joining us! Could you start off by introducing yourself to the readers and telling us a bit about your work?

Thanks! I’m from Sydney, Australia, I was born in the ‘70s so I still remember a time when you could drink on the beach and go out dancing until 6 am. I went to art school in the ‘90s to study painting and sculpture it was a great way to develop the capacity to see and explore possibilities of interpretation. I didn’t stick with it as a medium but the general processes I developed remain with me.  I only discovered photography in 2010 and I fell in love deeply, I quickly learnt everything I could about the technical craft of making photos, shooting, developing, editing, printing, and then put that aside to work intuitively.

Noh, Tokyo 2017 from the series  Tokyo is Yours  ©Meg Hewitt

Noh, Tokyo 2017 from the series Tokyo is Yours ©Meg Hewitt

What first drew you to photography?

With painting I could not successfully express the magic I observed in reality. Moments of synchronicity unfold in front of me and the first thing I do now is reach for my camera. I also love black and white, I love the textures and contrast, dodging and burning to expose the details in an image is so exciting

Underwater, Katsuura 2017 from the series  Tokyo is Yours  ©Meg Hewitt

Underwater, Katsuura 2017 from the series Tokyo is Yours ©Meg Hewitt

Your photos are visually striking and you get close to your subjects. When you are walking around, with camera in hand, what thoughts generally are going through your mind? Do you seek interaction from the subject?

Yes I thrive on interaction, I like to get in the zone and really participate in what is unfolding in front of me. Not just shapes and textures but narrative. I wander the streets with curiosity and wait for something or someone to speak to me visually and then I interact with it or them until I feel I have captured what fascinated me in the first place. I remain open to whatever comes up through the process. It’s a bit like interpretive dance. There is nothing going through my mind in particular, but I do thrive on the fear of not capturing what I see. It pushes me to work hard, I work with what is in front of me until I am completely exhausted, I never assume I have already made the best frame. If you do that you limit yourself.

Yuka, Tokyo 2017 from the series  Tokyo is Yours  ©Meg Hewitt

Yuka, Tokyo 2017 from the series Tokyo is Yours ©Meg Hewitt

“I thrive on interaction, I like to get in the zone and really participate in what is unfolding in front of me. Not just shapes and textures but narrative. I wander the streets with curiosity and wait for something or someone to speak to me visually…”

Owl, Tokyo 2017 from the series  Tokyo is Yours  ©Meg Hewitt

Owl, Tokyo 2017 from the series Tokyo is Yours ©Meg Hewitt

Do you have a clear idea, project or body of work in mind before you begin photographing in a new place? How did the idea to photograph in Tokyo and - more recently - New Orleans come about?

I wanted to photograph in Tokyo as I was struck by its proximity to the 2011 disaster in Fukushima, it is only 262km from the nuclear reactor which is closer than Sydney is to Seal Rocks. I wanted to know if you could feel what had happened in Tokyo and how it had affected the people there. This was the idea but I remained open to what I would find.

Two Schoolgirls with a Tiger from the series  Tokyo is Yours  ©Meg Hewitt

Two Schoolgirls with a Tiger from the series Tokyo is Yours ©Meg Hewitt

More recently I was invited to New Orleans for a residency. America fascinates me it feels so dangerous compared to Japan. I only spent a few weeks there, I want to go back and work more on a series based in New Orleans or even America as a whole.

No Photos, New Orleans 2018 ©Meg Hewitt

No Photos, New Orleans 2018 ©Meg Hewitt

You undertook an internship with Magnum photographer Jacob Aue Sobol, how did you find it? What did you learn from Sobol?

Yes, I assisted Jacob in his studio in Copenhagen in 2016/17. He is a very complex person, recently he revealed in an article that he suffers from a variety of mental health issues and there were a lot of ups and downs. He doesn’t believe in luck only in hard work, he expects a lot of people and is often let down by them or even by himself.  Even if you are a Magnum photographer it is hard to get by on print sales and Jacob rarely does assignments. He is great with social media and selling books/ posters. I learnt a lot about editing and sequencing he is very particular about it and can be quite harsh. I think I am harder on myself now, I imagine that I am going to show my work to somebody really critical and it helps me to cut out the flack.

Decatur Street, New Orleans 2018 ©Meg Hewitt

Decatur Street, New Orleans 2018 ©Meg Hewitt

Can you tell us a bit about your project Tokyo is Yours and what it’s like shooting street in Tokyo?

Tokyo is amazing. The city is a labyrinth, there are so many layers to it. You look at a grey office building and then if you take the time to explore its layers you will find pedestrian tunnels and tudor-style coffee shops in the basement, sure some offices, then maybe a country and western bar with a log cabin interior on the 5th floor or a sleeping space with pulsating, coloured walls on the ninth and guy with a 10,000 piece record collection on the roof. It is nuts.  The people are so friendly they are really passionate about whatever it is they are into, they give it their all. The culture can come across as conservative and polite but they really like to let their hair down too. One whiff of alcohol gives them permission to let loose. They have a great culture of bars, there are a million different bars some which only fit five or six people. Once inside one of these you are forced to interact with everybody, you walk out with five new friends.

Baseball, Tokyo 2016 from the series  Tokyo is Yours  ©Meg Hewitt

Baseball, Tokyo 2016 from the series Tokyo is Yours ©Meg Hewitt

How did you find the process of turning a body of work in Tokyo is Yours into a photobook? Can you tell us more about the concept, edit, and design processes? What are the biggest challenges in creating a photobook?

I decided I wanted to make a photobook after my first trip to Tokyo. I had a dream to make a graphic novel like a manga. I looked at a lot of books to decide on the format I wanted and then started to work towards that. I wanted the design to be full bleed and the printing to be tritone to really give a good quality to the blacks. When you are making work towards a book you become more conscious of the orientation of your images. You might start to look for details that enhance the other images in the editing. You are also very conscious of the middle of a horizontal image as that’s where the gutter will be when printing full bleed.

Sometimes you need to leave some good images out because they just don’t work in the flow of the edit. You also worry if any body is going to buy it. It is a big investment to print a book, you want to make sure that it is not just your friends and family that are interested and that your subject has reach beyond your own borders.

When you self publish you need to commit time to marketing and distribution, you are a one man band.

Girl with a Selfie Stick, Kyoto 2017 from the series  Tokyo is Yours  ©Meg Hewitt

Girl with a Selfie Stick, Kyoto 2017 from the series Tokyo is Yours ©Meg Hewitt

You are hosting a 5 day, all inclusive workshop in Tokyo in March, could you tell us about what it focuses on and what you hope students will get out of it? What kind of teacher are you?

Yes once a year I run a workshop in the Tokyo Spring. Japan is magic in Spring; the light is good, the temperature is mild and the city blooms like the cherry blossom. As a bonus, food and drink is cheaper than Australia and their public transport system is amazing.


I really encourage participants to make a series of images that work together and I push people to work hard. Everyday I focus on each participant’s individual needs. I want people to go beyond just good street snaps and people in markets kind of stuff. Sure, a good photo is partly about composition, but it needs to make me want to look again, I need to question it, engage with it, it should tell me a story.

I ask you what you want to see in Tokyo and offer advice on how to find it quickly and get to the essence of it. Tokyo is large, multilayered and with the language barrier it can be hard to penetrate quickly. Given that I have been there so many times I can help you get there quicker. On the first morning we do a group review of everybody's portfolio prior to the workshop. We do a night together where I show you some of the quirkier sides of Japanese life and introduce you to the haunts of the Japanese photographic community. I also spend time on the street alongside participants one-on-one if they have challenges they want to address. My favorite thing is witnessing how much people can grow in a week.

“I want people to go beyond just good street snaps . . . a good photo is partly about composition, but it needs to make me want to look again, I need to question it, engage with it, it should tell me a story.”

This year the workshop includes Japanese style accommodation. We all share the same house for five days so I am available to the participants 24hrs a day. At the end of the workshop we make a presentation of the images (and have a small party) Obviously when you get home you can share your slideshow with others and add it to your portfolio. You also leave with a bunch of new best friends.

Bucket by the Sea, Tokyo 2017 from the series  Tokyo is Yours  ©Meg Hewitt

Bucket by the Sea, Tokyo 2017 from the series Tokyo is Yours ©Meg Hewitt

What is your favourite photo of yours right now and why?

I made a photo in New Orleans recently that I call Saints and Sinners. It is the exterior of a bar on Bourbon street. When I stumbled across the scene the people looked like they were in a stage play it felt perfectly choreographed like they were all told to be a certain way in a particular spot. I remember the feeling I had when capturing the frame, I live for that feeling when you squeeze the shutter release and you just know.

Saints and Sinners, New Orleans 2018 ©Meg Hewitt

Saints and Sinners, New Orleans 2018 ©Meg Hewitt

Interview with Tomasz Kulbowski

Tomasz_Kulbowski--City-London.jpg

Tomasz Kulbowski is a documentary and street photographer who is the originator and director of the annual Eastreet exhibition and publication as well as a member of the Un-Posed street photography collective. He will be in Sydney this March delivering a one-day intensive street photography workshop and kindly agreed to have a chat with AUSSIE STREET's Sam Ferris.

Bondi Beach, Sydney. ©Tomasz Kulbowski

Bondi Beach, Sydney. ©Tomasz Kulbowski

AS: Hi Tomasz, thank you for chatting with us! Could you start off by introducing yourself and telling us a bit about your work? What drew you to street photography and what do you look for when you photograph on the street?

TK: Thank you for inviting me! I come in Lublin, Poland, although I’m on the road for few months - at the moment in Thailand, soon going to Australia… I travel a lot for photography, I teach workshops, I do collective work together with my colleagues from Un-Posed and manage the international exhibition and publication called Eastreet. But first and foremost I’m a documentary photographer. I’ve started using photography for personal and practical reasons. In 2004 I relocated from Poland to London and at that time it was almost like changing planets - I suddenly was in a completely new and different space. Photography became my main tool of getting familiar with these unknown surroundings, investigating them and understanding. I was always fascinated with seeing the world through the lens, but during my time in London I’ve started reading more about photography and developing a more conscious approach to my work (I think I’m still in this process). I was shooting every day, before and after work, during my lunch breaks and over weekends… Purely for myself and close friends, occasionally publishing my work on Flickr, which at that time was an amazing and inspiring community. After some time it became my main professional activity and now my whole life seems to be revolving around photography. I still use photography as a way of documenting and exploring both new places and familiar surroundings. I’m focusing on searching of those rare coincidences, brief moments that can transform an ordinary scene into a unique happening or a short story.

"I was shooting every day, before and after work, during my lunch breaks and over weekends… Purely for myself"

Opera House, Bennelong Point, Sydney. ©Tomasz Kulbowski

Opera House, Bennelong Point, Sydney. ©Tomasz Kulbowski

AS: You’ve worked previously in Australia, what’s your experience of shooting street photography here been like? Do you have any favourite locations? Anything unique about shooting down under?

TK: I’ve only been to few locations in this amazing country, but I can say that Sydney is one of my favourite locations in the world for street photography. Also a special place for personal reasons - here I got engaged to my wife (who is Polish Australian) and some of my good friends live here. I feel I need to properly explore Sydney and Australia - also through the lens. I really appreciate the work of local photographers like Narelle Autio, Trent Parke, Jesse Marlow, members of the Oculi collective and many others. It’s been a great source of inspiration and information about Australia and I’m very curious about finding my own approach and connection to that land. I’ve been also studying the work featured on Aussie Street Instagram - so many great frames to sharpen my appetite!

Shooting in Australia is a special experience. There’s one very unique quality that instantly comes to my mind: it’s the light! Especially in central Sydney - the light is unlike anything I’ve seen. It creates those amazing effects, with deep shadows and shapes of strong light cutting through them. Also, the public space of Sydney is really interesting, diverse and different from what I’m used to, which is always refreshing and inspiring. You can get a sense of open space and perspective, even in the central area with tall buildings and canyons of street. It’s less claustrophobic than some European or Asian cities I know well from my photography practice. I can’t wait to dive into Sydney streets again!

Bondi, Sydney. ©Tomasz Kulbowski

Bondi, Sydney. ©Tomasz Kulbowski

"Shooting in Australia is a special experience. There’s one very unique quality that instantly comes to my mind: it’s the light"

Bangkok, Thailand. ©Tomasz Kulbowski

Bangkok, Thailand. ©Tomasz Kulbowski

AS: You’re conducting an intensive, one-day workshop in Sydney on the 24th of March entitled “Beyond street Photography”. Could you tell us a little more about it and what the students can expect?

TK: I look forward to it! I’ve been thinking about organising an event like this for a long time. I’ve been teaching street photography workshops for about 7 years in various locations around the world and Sydney was always one of my dream locations. There’s a huge potential and some areas are true street photographer’s playgrounds!

My workshops take usually three days, but in Sydney I will be using a different formula. It will be a really intensive, one-day workshop where I’ll try to fit as much content in only 7-8 hours. This is not a  regular photo walk – more like a photo marathon! I have a specific plan and I want to take the participants through a certain process. We’ll start with some theory and I will discuss the “backstage” of many of my photos, explaining what was going on in the streets and in my mind, why those scenes captured my attention, how they developed, etc. Based on this I will try to equip the participants with techniques, tips, and tricks which they can use for the next hours when we all go out shooting in central Sydney. I’ll be shooting together with them, assisting with getting the best possible shots, as well as helping with issues related to working within the public space, like photographing strangers without being intrusive, developing their own approach and ideas. It’s going to be hard work but I’m expecting some great results from this! 

Trafalgar Square, London. ©Tomasz Kulbowski

Trafalgar Square, London. ©Tomasz Kulbowski

We won’t be only focusing on “classic” street photography frames – this will be our starting point into an exploration of other possibilities. I’m more interested in where this genre ends, what’s happening at its borders and how this candid and spontaneous approach can be used for other types of work. This is why I called the workshop “Beyond Street Photography”. I’ve been a professional event and documentary photographer for around 10 years now and I always try to incorporate some street-like thinking and tricks into what I do, even if it’s a commission work not directly related to street photography. it helps to keep your work fresh, unique and simply to have more fun doing it! It’s all about the right approach and perception - trusting your instinct and being properly focused on what’s going on around you. Being in the right place at the right time is not enough if you’re not prepared.

London City. ©Tomasz Kulbowski

London City. ©Tomasz Kulbowski

AS: You’re a member of Un-Posed Collective and been the driving force of the Eastreet exhibitions and publications, what’s the latest news from these endeavours?

TK: It’s been a great adventure and learning curve to be involved in those two project. Last year was busy for the Un-Posed members - exhibitions, books, workshops… this one will not be different. We’ve started a new project called Street Meet, presenting selected photographers from outside our team and discussing their work with the public. For the first one we’ve focused on Polish photographers but in the future, we will be opening this idea to foreign authors as well. We’re thinking about exhibitions and publications featuring our own work too. It’s interesting to see how different authors and personalities creatively collide and build something bigger together. It’s not always easy and straightforward, but it’s a great learning curve and a way to connect and give back to the community of street photographers.

Lublin, Polland. ©Tomasz Kulbowski

Lublin, Polland. ©Tomasz Kulbowski

Eastreet always keeps me super busy… It’s my child and I’m very happy with the latest edition: from over 11.000 photos submitted, precisely 100 were selected for Eastreet 4 by a team of highly skilled curators. We also have a new partner, which is The Centre for the Meeting of Cultures in Lublin, Poland, and the premiere exhibition opened last October at their gallery blew me away. Production was top-notch, we had a lot of visitors from whole Europe and published a beautiful book featuring all the photos included in Eastreet 4. Since the premiere, we had a chance to present Eastreet 4 in Bangkok and we’re working on other locations for this year. Eastreet is bi-annual now, so we finally have more time to properly put it on tour and share with other countries, connect with other photographers and promote the work of featured authors, which are our important goals. I’ve connected with so many amazing photographers and institutions through Eastreet. We’ve managed to create some sort of a community network between us, so we can support projects,  ideas and build something new together. It’s so great to see how photography connects people beyond borders, languages and differences - especially in recent times in Eastern Europe!

I would really love to present Eastreet in Australia one day. I’m actually started working on it already, fingers crossed!

"It’s my child and I’m very happy with the latest edition: from over 11.000 photos submitted, precisely 100 were selected"

Phuket, Thailand. ©Tomasz Kulbowski

Phuket, Thailand. ©Tomasz Kulbowski

AS: Thank you Tomasz, where can people find you, follow your work, or sign up for your workshop?

TK: The main source for my portfolio and the most important announcements like new exhibitions and workshops is my website http://kulbowski.com, I’m also active on social media, mainly Instagram http://instagram.com/kulbowski/. If you have any questions about my Sydney workshop or would like to sign up (only 3 places left) please drop me an email at workshops@kulbowski.com or go directly to the dedicated Meetup page https://www.meetup.com/Beyond-Street-Photography/events/247485920/

Thank you for having me, it’s always a pleasure to connect with fellow photographers!

Promenade, Zadar. ©Tomasz Kulbowski

Promenade, Zadar. ©Tomasz Kulbowski

Surin Beach, Thailand. ©Tomasz Kulbowski

Surin Beach, Thailand. ©Tomasz Kulbowski